Initial Quadrotor Design

 

I have been researching a variety of multi-rotor helicopter setups for some time.  I’ve been trying to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each design type.  I have come up with an initial design for my quad-rotor helicopter.  In attempts to create a very aggressive aircraft, I have designed the propellers to be a close as possible, as large as possible, and the motors to have a high power to weight ratio.  All of my assumptions about quadcopter design are very spectulative since I haven’t ever built one before. 

My first matter of design is a powerful CPU.  My fly-by-wire T-Rex 600 project used 4 Arduinos and they left a sour taste in my mouth.  Arduinos are great for quick prototyping but anything with substance needs a better processor.  Besides, I’m a Computer Engineer so I can’t justify using someone else’s poorly designed microcontroller libraries.  My microcontroller of choice for this project is the LPC1768 ARM Cortex-M3 by NXP Semiconductors.  It is a powerhouse!  I’ve written most of the low-level hardware drivers and a few of the higher level routines, such as PID controllers and Collective Cyclic Throttle Mixing (CCTM).  The combination of the ARM’s Cortex-M3 core with NXP’s hardware peripherials makes this as amazingly powerful design.  ARM+NXP=Happiness!

For aircraft attitude measurement, I’m planning on using the 9DOF Sensor Stick from Sparkfun.  Version 2 is still under design so I’ll have to wait on that.  I’m going to implement 3 different types of sensor fusion algorithms and see which type works the best.  The 3 algorithms are:

  • Complimentary Filter
  • Direction Cosine Matrix
  • Extended Kalman Filter

In the animation above, the two circles representing the propellers show the two sizes I will test.  The inner circles are a 12×3.8″ APCprop and the outer circles are a 14×4.7″ APCprop.  I haven’t seen another helicopter use the 14″ props before so I’ll get the 12″ props working first.

This is an explanation of the animation per level:

Level One (bottom):

  • LiPo battery
  • Receiver

Level Two (between the two metal plates):

  • 4x Electronic Speed Controllers

Level Three (top):

  • CPU
  • 3-Axis of Gyroscopes, Accelerometers, and Magnemeters

Outer Arms:

  • 4x Motors
  • 4x Props

I know that having the props close together makes the attitude harder to stabilize.  On the other hand, having the props close together will (I hope) induce much more torque on the frame from the motors.  This will help me overcome the lame yaw response of most quadrotor helicopters.  I’m banking on the fact that my CPU will be running at 100 MHz and I’ll hopefully have the sensor fusion filters and PID controller running at 400+Hz.  This should allow me to precisely adjust each axis of stabilization.  For better discrete calculus computations (integration and differentation) I’ll try running the sensor fusion algorithms above 1kHz and only commanding the ESCs at their maximum speed (50Hz-400Hz).  This will make the computations more accurate because each time step will produce less error.

  1. I hope your hours of research has settled on a design that will actually fly🙂 I am excited the hardware just showed up!! I think you are a little a head of me with all the LPC1768 drivers… I better start writing some code because I refuse to just use all your code files… where is the fun in that😉

      • nic
      • May 24th, 2011

      The main thing I am unsure about is the motor spacing. Maybe the best thing to try is a variable width test frame. Once the optimal spacing has been found, the outer slack can be cut off to reduce weight.

  1. May 16th, 2011

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: